Categories
Blog

Longines

Longines

For nearly a century and a half, Longines has been crafting precision timepieces out of its workshop high in the Jura mountains designed to serve the needs of adventurers of all stripes. While the brand with the winged hourglass may be most strongly associated with aviation’s early pioneers, Longines has carved its own place in history across countless ventures where precision timing is critical to success. From motorsports to horse racing to alpine skiing, Longines been a crucial part of all these endeavors. When SCUBA diving rose to prominence in the 1950s and 60s, capturing the public’s imagination and ushering in an era of underwater exploration, Longines was once again in the thick of it, producing precision dive watches at home on the wrists of professional and recreational divers alike. The Longines Legend Diver was born from this era, and its newest incarnation doubles down on the vintage styling by reimagining the Legend Diver with a bronze case and deep-green gradient dial.

While the Legend Diver can trace its lineage back to skin divers produced by Longines in the 1950s, the modern incarnation of the line is based on an iconic reference from 1960, the Longines reference 7042. This period in the mid-century was an era of exploration and experimentation, and not just underwater but in watch construction and design, as well. The 7042 was no exception, featuring an oversized (42mm) super-compressor case, inner-rotating bezel, and luminous hands and markers. The super-compressor design is a clever bit of engineering, whereby increasing water pressure increases pressure on the seals — the deeper you go, the tighter the seal. The case design, internal bezel, and dual hash-marked crowns are hallmarks of this style, and these aesthetic cues are all embraced in the current line of Longines Legend Divers.

Since Longines reissued the reference 7042 in the Longines Legend Diver, the watch has become a staple in the brand’s Heritage line, and Longines has produced several iterations in different sizes and finishes. This newest model marks a major departure in both case material and dial color, yet the bronze case and gradient green dial are a natural, organic fit for the watch’s vintage styling. Bronze is an ideal case material for this throwback design, evoking the grandeur and mystique of the early days of skin diving. In addition, bronze allows for an intimate ownership experience, as the watch will naturally patina over time, creating natural shifts in hue and texture that make each watch one-of-a-kind, telling the story of your adventures. Of course, the patina can be easily cleaned off and removed in a matter of minutes, allowing you to reset the clock and tell a new story.

Despite the vintage styling, the bronze Longines Legend Diver doesn’t overlook practicality and modern accouterments. The original reference 7042 featured a Plexiglas crystal, but in the modern iteration, Longines has opted for a highly domed box sapphire crystal that combines the warmth and charm of Plexiglas with the scratch-resistance and clarity of sapphire. Though the case is bronze, the caseback is crafted from titanium and features a re-creation of the original deeply embossed spear diver. To ensure legibility, no matter the time of day or the depth of the dive, the hands and hour markers are coated with Super-LumiNova.

The dial of the bronze Longines Legend Diver retains the styling of the rest of the line, including an internally rotating bezel, Arabic numerals at 3, 6, 9, and 12, and a distinctive and extremely legible handset. What truly sets this model apart is the deep emerald-green lacquered dial, which darkens to black toward the periphery. The dial is gorgeous; combined with the gilt hands and markers and framed by the bronze case, the effect is captivating and evocative of a bygone era.

Discover Longines at Linda & Co.

Categories
Blog

THE LONGINES HERITAGE CLASSIC CHRONOGRAPH 1946

THE LONGINES HERITAGE CLASSIC CHRONOGRAPH 1946

Throughout its long history. Longines has created pieces that hove stood the test of time. A reinterpretation of a watch from the forties, The Longines Heritage Classic Chronograph 1946 is a perfect example. This 40 mm creation reveals an understated dial that will thrill aficionados of the winged hourglass brand.

Longines extends its Heritage segment with a new interpretation, The Longines Heritage Classic Chronograph 1946. the reissue of a piece produced in the late 1940s. During this period, the Swiss brand designed a series of elegant timepieces at the cutting edge of technology at that time. Such models. with a timeless, understated style, continue to enthral vintage watchmaking connoisseurs today.

Within the 40 mm stainless steel case of The Longines Heritage Classic Chronograph 1946 is a self-winding chronograph movement developed exclusively for the brand IL895.51. In keeping with the design of the piece that inspired it, this watch features o domed silvered opaline dial enhanced by two finely sculpted counters, a 30-minute counter and a small seconds counter. The harmonious Arabic numerals, in the italic “dolphin” style characteristic of this period, set the pace for this timepiece. At 12 o’clock, LONGINES lettering is subtly applied to the dial in antique-style characters. The “leaf’-style hands in blued steel bring out the beauty of this elegant piece, topped with an anti-reflection sapphire crystal.
This model is mounted on a semi-matte black leather strap characterised by a soft texture and a resolutely vintage finish.

Categories
Blog

Simon Baker discovers the Longines universe in Saint-Imier

Simon Baker discovers the Longines universe in Saint-Imier

Longines Ambassador of Elegance and Australian actor Simon Baker visited the company in Saint-Imier, Switzerland, the birthplace of the brand since its inception in 1832. On this special occasion, Simon Baker was warmly welcomed by the employees before having the opportunity to discover the various departments of the headquarters.

Swiss watchmaking brand Longines was proud to welcome Simon Baker, its Ambassador of Elegance since 2012, to its headquarters in Saint-Imier.

During this very special day, Simon Baker had the opportunity to meet with the employees and to go through the complex process of creating a watch as he visited the production workshops.

After having had his very first cheese fondue in a typical Swiss restaurant, Simon had the pleasure to discover the treasures kept in the brand’s museum, which harbours collections representing all facets of Longines’ rich past.

Delighted to witness the watchmaking expertise and to immerge himself into the brand’s history, Simon Baker commented: “Having been part of the Family for seven years, it is overwhelming to finally be here, it puts a very human quality element to the whole brand that resonates directly in me. Being able to feel the love that the watchmakers have for what they do has been very enlightening and inspiring, it moves the product itself to a richer place.”

Categories
Uncategorized

The Longines 1832